RSI Online - Virtual Campus

News

3 thoughtful tips to help students design their futures

E-School News – Linda Hixson While moving into adulthood, teens are faced with a number of paths. Empowering students to select which path works best for them and determine how to best financially plan for the future are key to ensuring that some of their first adult decisions set them on a trajectory toward success. Read More:...

Giving kids an early financial education pays off in the future

CNBC – Jessica Dickler Students who are required to take personal finance courses starting from a young age are more likely to tap lower-cost loans and grants when it comes to paying for college and less likely to rely on private loans or high-interest credit cards, according to a study by Christiana Stoddard and Carly Urban for the National Endowment for Financial Education. (Students are also even more likely to enroll in college when they are aware of the financial resources available to help them pay for it.) Read More:...

Multilingual people have an advantage over those fluent in only two languages

News Wise – Staff Writer Multilingual people have trained their brains to learn languages, making it easier to acquire more new languages after mastering a second or third. In addition to demystifying the seemingly herculean genius of multilinguals, researchers say these results provide some of the first neuroscientific evidence that language skills are additive, a theory known as the cumulative?enhancement model of language acquisition. Read More:...

5 ways parents can help children with the ‘new’ math

The Conversation – Clarissa Thompson, Lauren K. Schiller, Marta Mielicki, Charles J. Fitzsimmons, and Daniel A. Scheibe Researchers haven’t completely figured out how to eliminate math anxiety. But as a researcher who studies why people hate math, I believe there are steps parents can take to combat any negative attitudes they may have toward math and to improve children’s math understanding. Five of those steps are listed below. Read More:...

Children’s problem solving extends beyond the brain

UGA Today – Kathryn Kao Teaching children how to think like a computer—or computational thinking—and equipping them with the skills to outthink the computer when problems arise, may be an effective way to help young students acquire the knowledge and skills to succeed in a range of STEM-related careers, including computer science. New research from the University of Georgia suggests that computational thinking in young children extends beyond the brain to include bodily movements and interactions with both people and tools in the environment to aid in effective problem solving. Read More:...