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Five overlooked benefits of learning a new language

Five overlooked benefits of learning a new language

The Toronto Sun – Staff Writer There are many cognitive and social benefits of learning a new language. Training your brain is as important as training your body for optimal health. Yet, despite all of the potential benefits, only a handful of people dare to actually learn a new language nowadays. Read...
Eureka!

Eureka!

Language Magazine – Carol Gaab Hands down, reading is one of the most powerful tools for facilitating acquisition of vocabulary—whether it is vocabulary from a first, second, or third language. Most educators acknowledge the power of reading to enhance one’s first (already-established) language (i.e., expand vocabulary, develop writing skills, and improve spelling), but many overlook the power of reading for facilitating acquisition of a second language (L2), particularly as it pertains to novice-level learners who have not yet developed strong listening-comprehension skills. Read...
6 Fun Science Activities For Toddlers & Up

6 Fun Science Activities For Toddlers & Up

Moms – Anupama Subramaniyam A growing child is always curious. Which is why they are constantly asking us questions. Thanks to quarantine, questions are mostly limited to things we see at home. So now with movements being limited, it’s time to bring the curious mind home. What better way to do it than with fun science experiments? If your kids think science isn’t fun, these projects are going to change their minds. So grab your kids and toddlers and choose which experiment you want to do (or you could do them all, what’s stopping you?). Read...
3 Ways to Reduce Stress and Build Connections During Distance Learning

3 Ways to Reduce Stress and Build Connections During Distance Learning

Edutopia – Sarah Gonser When people experience stress, the hormone cortisol is released in the body, producing the fight, flight, or freeze impulse. Some stress may be useful in preparing kids for challenging tasks like tests and performances. “This is the limbic system in the brain at work—attention, concentration, focus, memory, preparation,” writes Cantor. But persistently high levels of stress can become toxic, affecting attention and memory. The hormone oxytocin, however, can help protect children from these harmful effects. “Relationships that are strong and positive cause oxytocin’s release, which helps produce feelings of trust, love, attachment, and safety,” Cantor writes. “This not only helps children manage stress, but also offsets the damaging effects of cortisol and produces resilience to future stress.” As students head back to school this fall with the possibility of hybrid learning models and rolling school closures, educators and parents will play an important role in helping to “inoculate us against the intolerable stress of the scary, uncertain world we now live in,” she writes. Cantor suggests adults focus on a new take on the “Three Rs”: relationships, routines, and resilience. Read...